ATS Familiarization Presentation

ATS Familiarization Presentation

ATS Peer Observations Ramp Agents Member of PEER a person who is of equal standing with another in a group: Member of

Program Outline Why safety observations? What we are observing? How to conduct observations Observation form What to do with the results? Member of 3 Why?

An observation based safety program can be the foundation of a positive safety culture at your station. This along with near-miss reporting and incident investigations provides an excellent way of addressing the human factors of safety. Helps eliminate unsafe or hazardous acts and conditions It encourages participation from more people Increases safety individually and as a whole Leads to a continuous improvement of safety performance Member of

4 Benefits The ultimate goal of an observation process is the reduction of injuries and accidents (incidents). Enhance safety at your station

Enhance safety for all of ATS Better customer (airline) satisfaction Reduce costs On a more personal note the observation process will help promote a strong individual safety culture. Instead of being responsible for incidents you are part of the prevention process (management, you and your peers) Who is better qualified than you and your peers who know the risks and inherent dangers to identify and eliminate hazards or behaviors. Dont you think that by doing these observations your safety behaviors

will be influenced? Ownership! Member of 5 What are we observing? Most of our incidents are people based. Keep in mind that many times those involved meant well and didnt mean to have an incident but there are many reasons that lead up to the

incident. Rushing? Frustrated? Fatigued? Complacent?

Member of 6 What are we observing? We can and have identified the causes of both our accidents and our injuries. Our observation process has to be short and to the point so that it can be carried out in your operations. We have focused on the key behaviors that result in the most common incidentsTop Ten List Behaviors

Observable Identifiable Anonymous Member of 7 Member of 8

Member of 9 Are you really seeing what you think? Remember as you a conducting your observations to really see what you are looking at. Many times your routine becomes just that. Step back and look at your operation with a fresh set of eyes. Thats just the way we have to do it here Member of

10 How to conduct observations Obviously an observation will be based on what you see. It shouldnt end there. After the observation is conducted a briefing with your Peers is in order. Go over the results Dont identify individuals Focus on both safe and unsafe behaviorsWay to GoWatch Out Being able to talk to your Peers is the most important part of the

observation process. Commend them on things done well Bring up hazardous behaviors noticed Member of 11 How to conduct observations Our observations will need to be formatted in a way that they can be carried out during your normal routine. They will need to be done while you are actively working a flight.

Be familiar with the form Be familiar with the items on the form Keep these in mind when working Go back and complete the form

Review the results Submit the results Member of 12 Member of 13 https://atsconnect.com/peer Username: peer

Password: p33R Member of 14 Observation Form Basic information about the flight observed Aircraft type (is there a trend that correlates with the type of aircraft and frequency of safe or unsafe behaviors) Name of observer (You)

Time of observation (is there a time during the day that more safe or unsafe behaviors are noted) Broke down into two different sections Aircraft Damage Employee Injuries Did you observe the behavior? Yes, No, Not Observed If no indicate(use the drop down)

Member of 15 Lets take a look at what were looking for Were job duties and responsibilities well defined to me and others in my team? A well planned flight with clear and concise job duties will result in a safer operation. Did the agent in charge delegate responsibilities to all that were involved in the flight? Did everyone just assume they were assigned the same tasks

as before or did everyone actually know? Indicate "No" if the flight was not well planned in advance and choose the reason from the "drop down" list. Member of 16 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was I and my team members briefed on offload specifics and outbound load plan? Its important that all those that are involved in the flight

know what is coming off the flight and going on the flight. Did you know specifically what the inbound load was? Did you know specifically what the outbound load was? Indicate No if the specific load plans were not briefed and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 17 Lets take a look at what were looking for

Was the arrival huddle conducted with my team members and were all points covered? Plane Talk arrival huddles are required for all aircraft movements. Did the agent in charge truly cover all the points in the huddle or did we just "go through the motions"? Indicate "No" if the huddle was not completed and all items confirmed and choose the reason from the "drop down" list. Member of 18

Member of 19 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was the departure huddle conducted with my team members and were all points covered? Plane Talk departure huddles are required for all aircraft movements. Did the agent in charge truly cover all the points in the huddle or did we just "go through the motions"?

Indicate "No" if the huddle was not completed and all items confirmed and choose the reason from the "drop down" list. Member of 20 Member of 21 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was GSE set up at the gate for the arrival of the

flight? By having the proper GSE set up and available at the gate area prior to the arrival the flight will be handled easier and most importantly safer. Was the gate area set up with the proper GSE? Was the GSE staged in a manner that allowed safe and easy access to the aircraft? Indicate No if the GSE was not set up at the gate and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of

22 Member of 23 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was all GSE operated at safe speeds while the aircraft was being handled? All GSE must be operated at safe speeds. Generally this is at a walking pace while in the safety envelope of the aircraft.

Weather conditions, loads and other factors may require a slower speed to be safe. Indicate "No" if you see GSE being operated at unsafe speeds and choose the equipment from the "drop down" list. Member of 24 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was the 10 foot buffer zone adhered to while handling the aircraft?

Remember to adhere to the 10 foot buffer zone. Belt loaders, stair units, lav and water are the only GSE that this does not apply to If you noticed anything else indicate "No" and choose the equipment from the "drop down" list. Member of 25 Member of 26

Lets take a look at what were looking for Was the jet bridge completely clear of the envelope prior to aircraft movement? The aircraft arrival and departure path must be completely clear prior to aircraft movement. Jet bridges in the path are a leading cause of damages. Is the jet bridge and all portions of the jet bridge clear of the arrival path? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the "drop down" list.

Member of 27 Member of 28 Lets take a look at what were looking for Were guide persons used to position equipment and jet bridges to and from the aircraft? The use of a guide person is required when backing

equipment up to an aircraft, when positioning belt loaders at the aircraft and for jet bridges. Were guide persons used during the operation? If not indicate "No" and choose the equipment from the "drop down" list. Member of 29 Member of 30

Lets take a look at what were looking for Were belt loaders positioned properly at the aircraft? Belt loaders are one of the leading causes of damage to aircraft. It is important that they are positioned properly at the aircraft.

Not above the level of the pit Not below the level Not inside of the pit Not under the pit. Was the belt loader positioned correctly? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 31

Member of 32 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was the belt loader chocked prior to the driver getting off the unit? ATS policy requires that the guide person chocks the belt loader prior to the driver getting off of the seat. This will help prevent damage to the aircraft. Was this done? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason

from the drop down list. Member of 33 Member of 34 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did the driver back the belt loader away prior to lower the belt?

We have damaged aircraft by lowering the belt loader while it is still positioned at the aircraft. The front bumper on the belt loader catches on the bin and damages the sill plate. ATS policy requires the belt loader to be backed away approximately 3 feet before it is lowered. Was this done? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 35

Member of 36 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did the pushback driver wait for the wing walkers to signal "all clear" prior to beginning the push? We have had far too many damages during the departure process. Many times the pushback driver started pushing the aircraft before the wing walkers confirmed that the path was clear.

ATS policy is that the wing walkers display the "hold" signal and not give the all clear until they confirm that the departure path is all clear. Was this done? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 37 Member of 38

Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team participate in Stretch and Flex prior to beginning our daily activity? Strains and sprains from heavy lifting are the leading cause of injuries at ATS. One way to prevent these is by stretching and loosening up before your shift begins. ATS has a "Stretch and Flex" program that all should participate in in an effort to prevent these types of injuries. Did you and your team "Stretch and Flex" prior to your shift? If

not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 39 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team members seek assistance when lifting heavy and oversized objects? Another simple way to prevent injuries is to ask for help when lifting or handling heavy objects such as

wheelchairs, HR's, COMAT and cargo. Were you faced with this situation? If so did you or your team members ask for assistance? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 40 Lets take a look at what were looking for Was equipment positioned properly to prevent injuries to my team members?

When equipment is positioned correctly our job will be safer and we will have less injuries. Often times bag carts are positioned too close to the belt and this leads to unnecessary twisting that results in back injuries, (three feet is about the right distance). Raising or lowering the level of the belt loader to the proper height will also help (level with the cart height is about right). When we don't use the proper tools and equipment we may be inviting injuries. Use belt loaders when loading baggage to prevent unnecessary lifting and make for easier and safer access in and out of the pits.

Did you and your team have the equipment positioned correctly and did you use the proper equipment? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 41 Member of 42 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team members avoid slip trip and fall

hazards while working the flight? Slips, trips and falls are a leading cause of injuries. Stepping over tow bars and cart tongues are two common causes. Poor housekeeping is another. Clean up your work areas to prevent slip, trip and fall injuries. Of course weather is a factor too. Slipping on ice, snow or water is a common cause. These can all be easily prevented and eliminated. Three points of contact when getting on or off of equipment is important as well.

Did you and your team avoid these common slip, trip and fall risks? If not answer "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. . Member of 43 Member of 44 Lets take a look at what were looking for

Did all members of my team have and use the required PPE while performing their job duties? Having and using the proper PPE is an important step in preventing workplace injuries. Safety vests and hearing protection should be considered part of a ramp agents uniform. Gloves will help prevent and/or reduce the severity of hand injuries. Lavatory service gloves and a face shield just makes sense when servicing lavs. Gloves for our cabin service agents are required to help prevent the spread of germs when cleaning aircraft.

Fall protection should be considered a "zero tolerance" item you may not get a second chance if you fail to use fall protection. Did you and your team members have and use all the required PPE? If not answer "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 45 Member of 46 Lets take a look at what were looking for

Did my team members report and take unsafe equipment out of service? Injuries have occurred as a result of using faulty or unsafe equipment in the past. ATS has procedures in place for identifying, reporting, and taking unsafe equipment out of service. Anytime any piece of equipment is identified that is unsafe it should be: Reported to a supervisor Written up on the discrepancy board And tagged out of service so other will not use it.

Did you or your team members report unsafe equipment as required? If not answer "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 47 Member of 48 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team members maintain safe clearances while

equipment is operated? Keeping a safe distance from equipment and other hazards are important to prevent injuries. Remember that you should never stand directly in the path of the equipment you are guiding, if the brakes were to fail you could be injured. Be careful when walking in areas that equipment is being operated in. Walking out from blind spots could lead to an injury as well. You should never step between carts or dollies. The driver can't see you and you could be injured if they pull away. Did you and your team members maintain safe distances? If not

answer "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. . Member of 49 Member of 50 Lets take a look at what were looking for Were "heavy lift" job duties rotated between team members to prevent injuries? Performing the same job all day long is sometimes a factor

in the cause of injuries. One way to prevent this is to rotate job assignments between your team members. The same person shouldn't be in the pit every flight. Same with the bag room. Were job assignments rotated? If not answer "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 51

Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team members keep their hands clear of the connection points while connecting disconnecting Towbars, bagcarts, etc.? Hand injuries are often occur when connecting equipment. Not holding onto cart tongue handles has lead to hand injuries while connecting carts and tugs. Getting hands and fingers caught in "pinch points" is another reason as well. Did you and your team members keep your hands clear of these hazards? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop

down list. Member of 52 Member of 53 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team members keep their feet clear and not directly under the towbar and tongues of carts while

connecting/disconnecting? Foot injuries are often caused by heavy objects falling on them. The most common is tow bars falling on feet during the connection and disconnection process. Did you and your team members keep your hands and feet clear of these hazards? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. from the drop down list. Member of 54

Member of 55 Lets take a look at what were looking for Did my team members stay clear of inlet ingestion and jet blast zones? Jet blast and inlet ingestion incidents can have serious consequences. You and your team members must be aware of and follow safety precautions. Aircraft must not be approached until the engines are shut down

(nose gear chocking on some aircraft is an exception). You should not approach until the engines have spooled down (generally 30 seconds). You should not approach until the beacon light is turned off. Did you and your team members stay clear of inlet ingestion and jet blast zones? If not indicate "No" and choose the reason from the drop down list. Member of 56 Member of

57 What are we doing with the results? First we need to get them submitted. We ask that you complete one observation per shift. This will be a Leading Indicator and measured for your stations performance. The form should be filled out electronically https://atsconnect.com/peer Username: peer Password: p33R

All of the information will be kept confidential All of the data will be tracked and trended so that we can respond with changes to training, policies and procedures Member of 58 What should you do with the results? Locally you should respond to the trends you see and address issues in crew briefings, safety committees, and

local policies. (Share trending results with all) Member of 59

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