Plant Reproduction - Outcomes

Plant Reproduction - Outcomes

1 Plant Reproduction Outcomes Distinguish between asexual and sexual reproduction in plants. Describe a way in which a named plant can reproduce asexually. Locate the sepals, petals, carpel, and stamen. HL: Identify the stigma, style, ovary, anther, and filament. Give the function of the stamen, carpel, pollen, and ovary. Describe the life cycle of a flowering plant.

2 Plant Reproduction Outcomes HL: Describe seed structure. Understand that seed germination is necessary to produce a new plant. Investigate the conditions necessary for germination. 3 Distinguish Between Asexual and Sexual Reproduction

Sexual reproduction requires a male sex cell from one plant to fertilise a female sex cell of another plant. Sexual reproduction requires two parents. Asexual reproduction involves the formation of new individuals from the cell(s) of a single parent. Describe Asexual Reproduction Grass, potatoes, strawberries, onions, and crocuses are all examples of plants that reproduce asexually. Potatoes, for example

produce tubers which grow new potatoes after the existing ones are harvested or die. by BASFPlantScience CC-BY-SA-2.0 4 by Matt Lavin CC-BY-SA-2.0 5

Locate Plant Parts 6 Locate Plant Parts Petals attract insects to the flower by being colourful and in some cases, scented. Sepals protect the flower while it is growing. They may also help to attract insects by being colourful. Stamens produce sperm, the male sex cell / gamete. Carpels produce eggs / ova, the female sex cell / gamete. Plants have both male and female parts!

HL: Identify Reproductive Plant Parts by LadyofHats public domain 7 8 Give Function of Plant Parts The stamen consists of the anther and filament. Anthers produce pollen, which contains the sperm. Filaments raise the anthers up so visiting insects and wind pick up the pollen.

The carpel consists of the ovary, stigma, and style. Ovaries produce the eggs / ova. Stigma catch pollen from visiting insects and wind. Styles connect stigma to ovary. 9 Describe the Life Cycle of Flowering Plants Flowering plants have five stages of life. 1. Pollination 2. Fertilisation 3. Fruit and seed development 4. Dispersal

5. Germination Describe Pollination Pollination is the transfer of pollen grains from an anther (male part) to a stigma (female part). Insects may visit the flower to collect nectar, then the anther rubs pollen onto the insect. Wind may blow pollen from one flower to another. Self-pollination may occur when the male and female parts of a flower

mature at the same time and pollen falls from the anther to the stigma. by Tony Willis CC-BY-SA-3.0 10 11 Describe Fertilisation Fertilisation is the union of the pollen grain with the nucleus of the egg.

Pollen on a stigma produces a tube reaching down through the style, into the ovary. The nucleus in the pollen travels down this tube to reach the egg nucleus. 12 Describe Fruit and Seed Development A fertilised egg will grow to form a seed. The parent plant provides the seed with food, energy, and nutrients that will enable it to grow later. 13

Describe Dispersal Seeds must be dispersed so they dont compete with each other or the parent plant. Seeds may be dispersed by wind, animal, water, or explosion. Dispersal Method Wind Example Plant Feature

Dandelion Animal Berries, goosegrass Water lily, mangrove Peas, sandbox Light seeds with wings or hairs

Tasty or hooked Water Explosion / self Float Pods explode 14 Describe Germination Germination is the growth of a seed into a new plant. Seeds need water, oxygen, and warmth to germinate.

15 Investigate Germination 1. Set up four test tubes with some cotton wool and seeds. 2. Boil and cool some water, then add it to one test tube. 3. Add a layer of oil to the test tube. 4. Add tap water to two test tubes. 5. Leave one water test tube in a fridge. 6. Only the test tube with tap water at room temperature germinated.

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